AUTO INDUSTRY NEWS

Lean, Green and Safe: Toyota Prius achieves Euro NCAP top rating for occupant and child safety

Lean, Green and Safe: Toyota Prius achieves Euro NCAP top rating for occupant and child safety image

Text: / Photos: | posted July 25, 2004 00:00

Toyota Prius is the first hybrid car to be tested by Euro NCAP, is one of eight cars to achieve the top five star occupant rating and gets the highest rating for child protection, proving that cars can be lean, green and safe.

"These latest Euro NCAP continue to show significant improvements in car safety standards. Renault's Mégane CC has set a new benchmark for frontal crash test protection. Toyota's Prius shows that innovative 'green' hybrid technologies can also offer very good levels of safety. Honda meanwhile continues to lead in the crucial area of pedestrian protection. Also significant is the growing use of seat belt reminders. This very important as even the best performing car can offer five star safety if all the occupants use their seat belts," said David Ward, Director General of the FIA Foundation.

Euro NCAP announced the results of eight cars that have achieved the top five star accolade for occupant protection in Europe's leading independent crash tests.

Best in class for occupant protection is awarded to Toyota's Corolla Verso, and BMW's Z4.

Honda's Jazz becomes the first supermini to be awarded the three star Euro NCAP rating for pedestrian protection, proving that even the smallest cars can be pedestrian friendly.

And another first, Renault's Mégane CC is the first car ever to achieve the maximum score possible in the stringent frontal impact test.

The Euro NCAP rating requires occupants to fasten their belts. Again for the first time, an intelligent seat belt reminder for the rear seats has been introduced on a car, Volvo's S40. This is a significant development as increased seat belt wearing rates are essential if we are to maximise the enormous safety gains achieved by Euro NCAP over recent years and save the 7,000 fatalities attributed to non-belt use in Europe.