WiTricity, IHI and Mitsubishi to develop EV wireless charging systems

WiTricity, IHI and Mitsubishi to develop EV wireless charging systems image

Text: / Photos: | posted September 28, 2011 11:11

Making plug-ins obsolete

WiTricity Corporation, IHI Corporation and Mitsubishi Motors Corporation have agreed to join forces for the research and development into easily deployable electric vehicle (EV) wireless charging systems.

The aim of the collaboration is to make EVs remarkably more convenient for owners of future EVs by speeding up the development and availability of wireless charging at homes and shopping center parking lots, etc.

"Electric vehicles offer great potential for reducing CO2 emissions and reliance on fossil fuels," noted Mr. Eric Hiler, WiTricity CEO. "However, they must be user friendly, and wireless charging is an important feature that greatly improves the user experience. We are excited to work with industry leaders MMC and IHI on this important program."

"Like we have done with promotion and education of electric vehicle infrastructure such as quick-chargers and being involved with "smart grid" technology, we are happy to enter into a new phase of electric vehicle infrastructure development, comments Mr. Osamu Masuko, President of MMC. "I am confident we can be a major contributor along with WiTricity and IHI to quickly make widespread wireless charging for electric vehicles a reality."

Wireless charging systems allow transfer of energy from a source placed on or under the ground, to a vehicle equipped with an energy capture device. Charging occurs automatically when the vehicle is parked, with no physical contact between the vehicle and the charging source. WiTricity has already developed and brought to market its patented magnetic resonance wireless charging system.

Currently, EVs have been hampered by the lack of infrastructure in many countries, the inconvenience of actually plugging-in, as well as the typically long charging times associated with the powertrain. If successful, this triple partnership could greatly accelerate the use of zero-emissions electric vehicles in the future.