Late last year, Volkswagen pulled the covers off the all-new Golf. Of course, enthusiasts were asking, “When will the GTI come out?”

Well, the (relatively short) wait is over as the German automaker has unveiled the eighth-generation of their hot hatchback. Not only does it have a new body, but the 2020 Golf GTI also packs more power and torque than its predecessor as well. In typical Golf GTI fashion, there are subtle additions to the exterior that differentiates it from the standard, tamer models.

VW Golf GTI image

For instance, there's the signature red strip on the grill, which has been part of the GTI for more than 40 years. There's also a red strip within the car's headlights, just above the LED daytime running lights (DRLs). To add a little more spice to the hatchback's front end, Volkswagen even gave it DRLs on the grill as well. The fog light arrangement is of particular interest, forming an 'X' on each corner.

VW Golf GTI image

The flanks on the other hand come with a subtle skirt, and there's also a full view of those new wheel designs. Wheel sizes for the GTI range from 17-inches, all the way to 19-inches. At the rear, there's a more prominent tailgate spoiler, rear bumper trim that's unique to this variant, and a GTI badge right at the center of the car. And yes, those tailpipes are real.

VW Golf GTI image

Like the exterior, the interior gets subtle upgrades that stick to the GTI lineage. The 2020 edition continues the tradition of having tartan pattern seats, along with red highlights strewn throughout the cabin. Even the ambient lighting in the car is red as well, although the color can be changed if the owner wants a different shade.

VW Golf GTI image

Standard equipment on the other hand includes a GTI-specific 10.25-inch Digital Cockpit, 10-inch infotainment screen, stainless steel pedals, a smart key, autonomous emergency braking, and lane keeping assist.

VW Golf GTI image

Under the hood for the all-new Golf GTI is a turbocharged 2.0-liter, four-cylinder engine. While it's been that way since 2005, it makes much more than the outgoing model. Power is rated at 245 PS and 370 Nm of torque. There are no performance estimates just yet, but expect it to go faster than the 6.2 second claim for the 0 to 100 km/h sprint of the previous generation. For those who prefer to row their own, they will be delighted to know that the standard transmission of the GTI is still a six-speed manual with a seven-speed dual-clutch gearbox being an option.

Unfortunately, the odds of the eighth-generation Golf GTI coming here are slim. Given that we no longer have the Golf or Golf GTI in the country, we can only hope that this hot hatch will eventually return here someday. Perhaps Volkswagen can offer the all-new GTI as an indent order special?