Ferrari is known for building some of the most beautiful sports cars on the planet from the new SF90 to the 812 Superfast. But if there is any Ferrari that can make their standard production vehicles look rather plain, it is their one-off specials.

Take a look at this One-off Omologata for example. It might look like an 812 Superfast, but the folks over at Maranello reworked nearly all of the body panels apart from the headlights and windshield. The end result is a beautiful grand tourer finished in three-layers of Rosso Magma paint. Meanwhile, carbon fiber accents all around and a number 7 livery for the final touch. Why 7? We don't know. We doubt the owner chose that number randomly.

One-off Omologata makes other Ferraris look basic image

The Omologata was commissioned by a certain European client. From the looks of it, the one-off Ferrari does take inspiration from classic models such as the 250 GTO with the additional “nose” intakes. Meanwhile, the rear window features louvers to give the V12 grand tourer a retro '70s or '80s touch.

One-off Omologata makes other Ferraris look basic image

Inside, there are more classic Ferrari elements. Exposed metal finishes can be found all throughout the cabin such as the dashboard and steering wheel. Ferrari even used wrinkle-finish paint for the dashboard to mimic its classic racing cam covers. Unusually the seats are upholstered in blue but he rest of the cabin is finished in black, allowing the other colors stand out.

Ferrari said little about the Omologata when it comes to mechanicals. For reference, the 812 Superfast it is based on packs a naturally aspirated 6.5-liter V12 engine that produces 789 horsepower and around 718 Nm torque. Whether the one-off Ferrari gets power upgrades or not will remain a mystery.

One-off Omologata makes other Ferraris look basic image

The Omologata is only the 10th one-off model built on a front-engine V12 Ferrari since 2009, making it truly rare. Despite being road-legal, odds are the public will never see the Omologata driving around on European roads as owners of such vehicles tend to keep them as garage queens.