What is happening over at General Motors?

The American automaker announced that they will be closing down five factories, and discontinue a fair chunk of models. The cars that will be axed comprise of sedans from Chevrolet, Cadillac, and Buick.

The five plants that will be shut down consist of three vehicle assembly lines, one engine line, and one transmission line. Vehicle assembly lines that will be 'unallocated' will be Oshawa plant in Ontario, Canada, Detroit-Hamtramck plant in Detroit, Michigan, and the Lordstown plant in Warren, Ohio. As for the powertrain lines, the Baltimore, Maryland plant and Warren Transmission Operation will be left 'unallocated' by next year.

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It is worth noting that the three auto assembly lines are home to several sedans built by GM. With no plans for the plant beyond 2019, it appears that GM is cutting back on the classic four-door sedan body style. Six sedans are likely to face the chopping block by next year, and these are the Chevrolet Impala, Chevrolet Cruze, Chevrolet Volt, Cadillac CT6, Cadillac XTS, and Buick LaCrosse.

That said, GM will still have some sedans in their stables. From Chevrolet, there's the Malibu and Spark sedan, while Buick will keep the Regal and Regal GS. Cadillac on the other hand still has the CTS. Sedans offered outside of the US and Canada are likely to continue production through other facilities such as GM China, and GM South Korea.

GM says the plant closures will help them save $ 6 billion in operating expenses. They add that these measures will also help them develop their electric vehicle program, and autonomous driving research, and other research and development matters for vehicle design. GM also said that they will be further developing the pickup, SUV, and crossover lines in the coming years as well. 

With five plant closures, GM will be cutting about 15% of its salaried workforce, which consists of over 10,000 people. For now, it is yet to be known if the displaced employees will be working in other branches of GM, or be made redundant.