It was back in February when we saw what Honda's new global electric hatchback will eventually look like. Set to be revealed in production guise soon, the e Prototype borrows some styling cues from the Urban EV concept (from which it was heavily based on), giving it a retro-inspired look reminescent of some classic hatchbacks of yesteryear.

But while it may look cool inside and out, we don't know what exactly makes this EV tick...until now that is. Recently, the Japanese automaker released new details about the hatchback's chassis, battery, and electric motor technologies. From the looks of things, the Honda e will be a technological marvel for the future of mass EV mobility.

Honda

Take for example its dretrain layout. Unlike most EVs which are front-wheel drive or all-wheel drive, Honda's first mass-produced EV will be rear-wheel drive. According to Honda, their decision to make it RWD was to make the electric motor deliver faster accleration, as well make its steering more precise.

Then there's its compact battery pack which Honda claims can hold 35.5 kWh worth of charge. This translates to a maximum range of over 200 km. It even comes with fast-charging technology which allows it to be recharged at 80% in just 30 minutes. And to keep the batteries at optimal temperatures, Honda installed a water-cooling system which keeps them cooled and working efficiently.

Honda

Finally, the Honda e will have 50:50 weight distribution between the front and rear axles. This was made possible thanks to a lightweight and durable chassis, and floor-mounted battery pack. Also, with the charging system placed at the front and the electric motors mounted at the rear, it helps maitain the 50:50 weight distribution.

Given all that Honda has made for their upcoming EV, Honda wants their future hatchback to be as efficient, compact, and practical as their gas-powered automobiles. With production of the EV set to begin in 2019, we're hoping that of the technological accolades Honda mentioned translates to a fun and engaging driving experience should it make its way here.