While larger supercar manufacturers caved in and began selling SUVs to bump up their sales figures, here we have Koenigsegg proving that a low-slung coupe can still be practical as a four-seater with enough room.

In the decades since Christian Von Koenigsegg made waves in the supercar realm as an individual manufacturer from Sweden, the company has been known for its mid-engined tech-laden vehicles with their signature ‘Dihedral Synchro-helix doors’. Now though it seems like they’re getting their feet wet with another entirely different segment – that of four-seater Grand Tourers.

Koenigsegg Gemera image

The new Koenigsegg Gemera is just that: their very own take at what they call a ‘Mega-GT’ that revolutionizes the way people have defined these types of vehicles since. The signature doors are now much larger, because while the Gemera seats four there is still only a pair of doors for it to be classified as a true coupe. Koenigsegg says that the design and profile of the vehicle was inspired by, of all things, an egg.

This explains its somewhat elongated profile, yet somehow the whole look ties up together fairly well. A glance at the rear end hints at similar design cues to the Porsche 718 Cayman’s taillights and ducktail, as well as the 918’s high-mount exhausts. The stripe through the side windows appear to take inspiration from the McLaren F1 as well. Staring at the front end though, you can see that this car is well and truly a koenigsegg – just in a shape different from what we’re used to.

Koenigsegg Gemera image

That’s because of where they’ve located the Gemera’s powerplant – in front. For those that are very keen on numbers, the figures from the Gemera will surely be staggering. It has a three-cylinder, 2.0-liter twin-turbo making 640 PS on its own. It is then supplemented by an electric motor attached to the crankshaft for another 400PS.

All well and good, but another pair of electric motors good for 500 PS are mounted on each rear wheel as well. Put all of these together simultaneously and the Koenigsegg Gemera is good for 1,700 horsepower with 3,500 Nm of torque. These all translate to  0 – 100km/h sprint of just a hair under 2 seconds.

Koenigsegg Gemera image

Going back to that three-cylinder motor, Koenigsegg has dubbed the powerplant as their Tiny Friendly Giant (TFG) considering its diminutive size relative to output. This is the first production motor to utilize Koenigsegg’s Freevalve technology, an efficient means to control combustion via intelligent valving without the use of camshafts or any associated equipment to move the valves. This powerplant is mated to a direct drive transmission towards all four wheels – all capable of torque vectoring as well as all-wheel steering.

The interior, upon first impressions, looks akin to a concept car – and perhaps that’s a good thing. Screens next to the A-pillars act as your side mirrors that relay the view from cameras on each side. Infotainment is provided via two large screens both for front and rear occupants. All the cupholders can be configured for either cooling or warming of beverages, and the storage compartments can hold about four pieces of luggage (including the trunk up front).

Koenigsegg Gemera image

The trio of electric motors take juice from an 800V 15 kWh battery. Supposedly on electric power alone, the Gemera is capable of traveling 50 km, but with the hybrid powertrain in sync it will have a total range of 1000 km.

Koenigsegg Gemera image

Considering of course that Koenigsegg is one of the world’s premium boutique car manufacturers, the Gemera will only be made in very limited numbers: 300 cars to be exact. Prices have yet to be announced for this, but we’re pretty sure the missus will not approve of the expense despite its ‘practicality’.