No one ever wants to be in a vehicular accident. But sometimes, it is simply unavoidable. Should you, unfortunately, find yourself in a bad accident, you would want medical professionals to get there quickly. It is often said that an accident victim's survival rate depends on how quickly they receive medical attention. 

Subaru, Nissan, Mazda latest’s tech can save lives in an accident  image

In order to speed up emergency response times during an accident, Subaru, Mazda and Nissan are partnering up to equip their vehicles with an advanced collision detection notification system called ‘D-Call Net’. The three automakers are the latest to join the group which comprises of Toyota and Honda, to collaborate with the Emergency Medical Network of Helicopter (HEM-Net) in further developing the system.

Subaru, Nissan, Mazda latest’s tech can save lives in an accident  image

D-Call Net works by using vehicle connectivity technology to alert the proper authorities such as fire departments and air ambulance services when an accident occurs. The authorities will assess and estimate the severity of the accident then dispatch the proper first responders. The automated system would greatly reduce the time for first responders to arrive, giving those involved in the accident a better chance of surviving. According to research, D-Call Net can help reduce the time it takes for accident victims to receive first contact with emergency responders by as much as 17 minutes.

Subaru, Nissan, Mazda latest’s tech can save lives in an accident  image

The new safety feature is currently being rolled out only in Japan models for the time being. There is no word as to when or whether the system will be made available to those in the U.S., Europe, and other regions.  

"Going forward, with the participation of SUBARU, Nissan, and Mazda, we hope to contribute both to an improvement in the number of lives saved throughout Japan and to the realization of a society free of traffic accidents, by introducing D-Call Net® support into as many vehicles as possible," said Nobuo Shinoda, HEM-Net Chairman of the Board.