It's easy to see why all-new Hyundai Elantra has been creating quite a stir since its global debut just a few weeks ago. The compact sedan has undergone a massive makeover both inside and out. Overall, it sure looks good. Some might even say it looks like a smaller version of the Sonata.

Check out the hybrid version of all new Hyundai Elantra image

Aside from the new looks, the South Korean automaker announced that the new model would be offered as a hybrid for the very first time. During its reveal, however, Hyundai didn’t release any photos of the hybrid Elantra. Instead, we were only treated to the standard model with a bright red hue. Now, we get to see the more fuel-efficient model in the metal in a new gray color together with more details about the electrified powertrain.

Check out the hybrid version of all new Hyundai Elantra image

Styling-wise, the Elantra Hybrid looks visually similar to that of its none hybrid counterparts. It’s still very edgy all around and features the redesigned Cascading Grill paired with sharp headlights up front. At the rear, the brand’s signature H-Tail lamp is retained as well its new coupe-like appearance. As a result, the only way to tell the hybrid from the standard Elantra would be the badge at the rear.

Check out the hybrid version of all new Hyundai Elantra image

Inside, however, it’s a different story. While the dashboard and layout are exactly the same, the digital gauge cluster does have a distinct look. Rather than an RPM counter, you’ll find the same kind of display typically found in other hybrid vehicles. There are also graphics that illustrate what the electrified powertrain is doing (i.e. charging the battery).

Check out the hybrid version of all new Hyundai Elantra image

Despite being a hybrid, it still packs quite a punch. Under the hood, the Elantra Hybrid is powered by a 1.6-liter GDI Atkinson-cycle, four-cylinder engine that is paired with an electric motor and a 1.32-kWh lithium-ion battery pack. The combined output is rated at 139 PS and 265 Nm torque. The engine is then mated to a six-speed dual-clutch transmission sending power to the front wheels. It also features an electric-only driving mode that delivers “instantaneous torque” at low speeds. Hyundai says the Elantra Hybrid can average around 21 km/l.

It’s uncertain whether the Elantra Hybrid variant will be sold locally. But with the ongoing pandemic, it might be a while before the all-new Elantra even makes it to full production, much less on Philippine roads.