Like most automakers around the world, Toyota has also been heavily affected by a parts shortage, forcing the automaker to pause production on several models. In July, the automaker temporarily stopped production of the Fortuner and the Hilux in Thailand when its suppliers were affected by the virus. Last month, Toyota announced nearly all of its production lines in Japan would halt production for the same reason.

It seems things have only gotten worse since then. Toyota recently announced that more production adjustments will be made for its September and October operations. This time, 10 lines in 9 plants out of 28 lines in 14 plants are affected by the temporary pause in production.

According to the automaker, the global production volume affected by these adjustments will be approximately 70,000 units (40,000 units overseas and 30,000 units in Japan) for September and 330,000 units (180,000 units overseas and 150,000 units in Japan) for October.

The models affected by Toyota's new pause in production include the Land Cruiser Prado, Land Cruiser 70, FJ Cruiser, and the Yaris Cross, to name a few. Aside from Toyotas, several Lexus models such as the ES, UX, NX, RX, and GX are also included.

“As the demand for semiconductors in all industries continues to increase, we are continuously assessing the situation and discussing medium- to long-term countermeasures with related companies. Our focus remains on doing everything we can to deliver as many cars as possible to our customers as quickly as possible, such as shifting our production plans to models with high demand,” said Toyota in a statement.

So if you plan on ordering a Land Cruiser Prado or the Lexus GX because the lines of the new Land Cruiser 300 are too long, you might have to end up waiting for your unit too. The same goes for several Lexus models. Still, it's better than having to possibly wait four years for your new LC 300.

With the production of the current Prado halted, it means the all-new Land Cruiser Prado model could be delayed as well. Hopefully, that's not the case.