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Tools

Started by clyde, October 21, 2003, 12:24:12 PM

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clyde

October 21, 2003, 12:24:12 PM Last Edit: October 21, 2003, 12:28:12 PM by clyde
Tools:[/b]

A selection of good tools is a basic requirement for anyone who plans to maintain and repair his/her own vehicle. For the owner who has few tools, the initial investment might seem high, but when compared to the spiraling cost of professional auto maintenance and repair, it is a wise one.

The newcomer to practical mechanics should start off with a minor repair tool kit which is adequate for the simpler jobs performed on a vehicle. Then as confidence and experience grow, the owner can tackle more difficult tasks, buying additional tools as they are needed. Eventually the basic kit will be expanded into the repair and overhaul tol set. Over a period of time, the experienced do-it-yourselfer will assemble a tool set complete enough for most repair and overhaul procedures and will add tools from the special category when it's felt that the expense is justified by the frequency of use.


When buying tools:[/b]


For the do-it-yourselfer (DIY) who is just starting to get involved in a vehicle maintenance and repair, there  are number of options availabel when purchasing tools. If maintenance ad minor repair is the extent of the work to be done, the purchase of individual tools is satisfactory. If, on the other hand, extensive work is planned, it would be good idea to purchase a modest tool set from one of the large retail chain stores available. A set can usually be bought at a substantial savings over the individual tool prices, and they often come with a tool box. As additional tools are needed, add-on sets, individual tools and a larger tool box can be purchased to expand the tool selection. Building a tool set gradually allows the cost of tools to be spread over a longer period of time and gives you or your mechanic the freedom to choose only those tools that will actually be used.

Tool stores will often be the only source of some special tools that are needed, but regardless of where tools are bought, try to avoid cheap ones, especially when buying screwdrivers and sockets, because they won't last very long. The expense involved in replacing cheap tools will eventually be greater than the initial cost of quality tools.

Invest wisely.  ;)

Care and maintenance of tools: [/b]

Some tips in handling those precious tools you have:

Good tools are expensive, so it makes sense to treat them with respect. Here's how:

1. Keep them clean and in usable condition.
2. Store them properly when not in use.
3. Always wipe off any dirt, grease or metal chips before putting them away.
4. Never leave tools lying around in the work area. Upon completion of a job, always check closely under the hood for tools that might have been left there so they won't get lost during a test drive or worst can
cause further damage to moving mechanical parts in the engine.

Some tools, such as screw drivers, pliers, wrenches and sockets, can be hung on a panel mounted on the garage or workshop wall, while others should be kept in a tool box, tool bag or tray.

Measuring instruments, guages, meters, etc. must be carefully stored where they cannot be damaged by weather or impact from other tools.

When tools are used with care and stored properly, they will last a very long time. Even with the best of care, though, tools will wear out if used frequently. When a tool is damaged or worn out, replace it. Subsequent jobs will be safer and more enjoyable if you do.

Happy wrenching!  ;)





LowPlainDrifter

good investment for tools;

SnapOn Tools

pricy but it's all worth it

smaw^

eh yung craftsman??? binigyan kasi ako ng tita ko... malay ko kung anung brand yun... hehehe

LowPlainDrifter

craftsman - Sear's brand, it's also good, nothing compared to SnapOn good but it's good

RS_Sprint

Was looking at a Snap-On tool set with that cart about 3 feet tall. The shop (Automechanika) told me this cost 200k with everything in it. Wow!
erL Motorwerx
51 C. Benitez st., Horseshoe, Cubao QC
(02)413-3911
erlmotorwerx@yahoo.com


http://www.erlmotorwerx.com -

LowPlainDrifter

Quote from: RS_Sprint on November 02, 2003, 03:52:25 AM
Was looking at a Snap-On tool set with that cart about 3 feet tall. The shop (Automechanika) told me this cost 200k with everything in it. Wow!

most certified veteran mechanics have 12feet wide tool boxes that cost somewhere from 10-12k$

it's not a joke but its like what an M.D. would have done

argie

hello guys! what are the standard tools ba i need in my car..as of now i only have a screwdriver and a plier.tnx

drexx

02Nov2003 (UTC -7)

As a starter, get a set of metric (for Japanese cars) spanners/sockets/wrenches, a set of screwdrivers, a multimeter, electrical tape, a utility knife, a car jack, and some clean rags. A metallic saucer to hold the bolts is a very nice thing to have too. This will help you get by in most situations.

Once you started working on your car yourself, then you will know what tools to add.

Start with cheap tools, and upgrade only if you have too. That way, if you make a mistake in buying stuff, loose it somewhere (or your friend forgets to give it back), or if you break it, it won't hurt so much.

That said, I think Snap-On is too expensive for me (I've lost a few tools while on the trail, or when friends accidentally mix their stuff with mine). I've broken a couple of Craftsman tools (their return policy maybe great, but it's useless when I'm a few hundred km away from the city). So far, Husky and Stanley tools are a good balance between strength and price.
Drexx Laggui  -  TLCA; PMC
San Jose, CA, USA
My off-road action! UZJ-100W; FZJ-80L; HDJ-80L; LN-166
[IMG]htt

RS_Sprint

Yeah OK Stanley pero dito sa 'Pinas may fake narin!  :o  >:( :(
erL Motorwerx
51 C. Benitez st., Horseshoe, Cubao QC
(02)413-3911
erlmotorwerx@yahoo.com


http://www.erlmotorwerx.com -

DTNS

speaking of tools, SM Workshop has a promo on 2T Floor Jacks. 30% off!!! :o :D ;D

I got mine for P659 when normally it would have cost ~P940.  :P

johnqpublic318

Quote from: drexx on November 02, 2003, 04:14:03 PM
02Nov2003 (UTC -7)

That said, I think Snap-On is too expensive for me (I've lost a few tools while on the trail, or when friends accidentally mix their stuff with mine). I've broken a couple of Craftsman tools (their return policy maybe great, but it's useless when I'm a few hundred km away from the city). So far, Husky and Stanley tools are a good balance between strength and price.

Snap-On is great but we use mostly Facom (France) for BMW and Porsches...  

Low-rating (5-60 newton-mtr) metric torque wrenches with open end wrench head adaptors (instead of rachet heads) don't seem to be available from Snap-On.

For cars and light-duty truck, to start with, I suggest a set of combination wrenches, a 3/8 drive socket set,  3/8 drive 150-lb torque wrench, magnetic screw drivers, vise-grip, needle-nose pliers, breaker-bar, electrical tape, WD40, brake cleaner, telescoping magnet (for picking up stuff that you drop inside tight confines), ball hammer, rubber mallet, jack stands, 5-ton floor jack, digital multi-meter and gloves.

In the Philippines, Draper brand from True Value at Rockwell should be good enough.  I hear True Value will replace any Draper brand hand tool and socket for free anytime it breaks.  However, please verify with them before buying.

Rodracing

Tools that I suggest:
- A feeler gauge, is a must for DIY tune-ups.
- Timming light
- Multimeter
- torque wrench
- socket wrench but use the ratchet handle only when you need it otherwise use (or buy) a solid handle for initial removal and final tightening of the bolt. Proper use will make you're tools last longer, I even have my taiwan made socket wrench and it still works - huwag lang puwersahin.
- adjustable wrench & vise grip (use only for last resort)
- WD40 for those stuborn bolts

clyde

Quote from: rodracing on January 09, 2004, 04:13:42 AM
- socket wrench but use the ratchet handle only when you need it otherwise use (or buy) a solid handle

it's a power handle or breaker bar that is.


NSR

January 26, 2004, 09:47:14 AM #13 Last Edit: May 08, 2004, 09:23:23 PM by NSR-3
Quote from: LowPlainDrifter on October 24, 2003, 06:45:00 AM
craftsman - Sear's brand, it's also good, nothing compared to SnapOn good but it's good

If there is a brand that would come close or even perform as good as SnapOn it would be CRAFTSMAN... ;)

Good quality backed up by Lifetime Warranty plus way way affordable prices compared to SnapOn is a deal very hard to resist  ;D

Ganito ka simple yan...

JDM-SnapOn
USDM-Craftsman
(usually that is) ;)

Pinoy...KYK  ;D

stradale

Facom tools are the best quality tools I've seen. Most expensive pati.  The salesman said they were the tools of choice for the McLaren F1 supercar. That is saying something considering the cost-no-object design brief for that car.

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