With SUVs and crossovers becoming the popular choice for car buyers, the market for sedans has significantly dwindled over the years. So much so that almost every automaker now has an SUV or crossover in every size available in order to keep up with market demand. What's worse is that some automakers such as Ford have already decided to kill off its sedan models in order to meet changing consumer preferences, and replace them with crossovers and SUVs.

Last Ford Taurus rolls off the assembly line image

One of the first few vehicles to get the axe in Ford's sedan lineup is the Taurus, as the last production unit recently rolled off Ford's Chicago Assembly Plant. Since its introduction in 1985, the Taurus has gone on to become one of Ford's best selling models of all time, especially in North America. According to Ford, more than 8 million Taurus passenger cars were built at their Chicago plant over the car's 34 years of near continuous production.

Last Ford Taurus rolls off the assembly line image

“Taurus broke new ground at its start and we’re thankful for its role in our portfolio,” said Mark LaNeve, Ford vice president, U.S. marketing, sales, and service. “Those same kinds of innovations will continue for today’s customers with Ford Explorer and the rest of our lineup.”

Spanning six generations, the first-generation Taurus featured a departure from the boxy sedan shapes of the time and featured a 140 horsepower V6. Later on, the more powerful SHO model would appear, fitted with a 220 horsepower V6. By 1992, the Taurus had already been named one of America's best selling models.

Last Ford Taurus rolls off the assembly line image

Ford will soon retool the Chicago Assembly Plant for production of the 2020 Explorer, Police Interceptor Utility and the all-new Lincoln Aviator. The automaker will also be investing an additional $1 billion at its Chicago Assembly Plant, adding an additional 500 jobs and expanding the plant's capacity.